Study Examines Med School Diversity After Accreditation Standards Introduced

JAMA

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 11 A.M. (ET), TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2018

Media advisory: To contact corresponding author Dowin H. Boatright, M.D., M.B.A., M.H.S., email Ziba Kashef at ziba.kashef@yale.edu. The full study is available on the For The Media website.

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Bottom Line: This observational study looked at changes in student makeup by sex, race and ethnicity at U.S. medical schools after an accrediting organization introduced diversity standards in 2009. An analysis of data from 120 medical schools suggests implementation of the diversity standards were associated with increasing percentages of female and black students. The study cannot demonstrate causality and other unaccounted factors could help explain the findings. Researchers noted the results are promising but that disparities persist in the diversity of the physician workforce.

Authors: Dowin H. Boatright, M.D., M.B.A., M.H.S., Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, and coauthors

 

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jama.2018.13705)

Editor’s Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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