Self-reported Sexual Harassment, Subsequent Reporting Among Internal Medicine Residents

JAMA Internal Medicine

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 11 A.M. (ET), TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2023

Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2022.6108?guestAccessKey=1caae61f-ef95-4e1f-b079-f85825cce02f&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=011723

 

About The Study: Among a U.S. national cohort of internal medicine residents, 1 in 4 women vs 1 in 31 men experienced sexual harassment. Most residents understood the process for formally reporting, yet few reported, and even fewer reported to their residency leadership. Less than half were satisfied with the outcome. These findings highlight the need for meaningful action on reports of sexual harassment and mistreatment to create a safer workplace for residents. 

Authors: Elizabeth M. Viglianti, M.D., M.P.H., M.Sc., of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, is the corresponding author.

 

(doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2022.6108)

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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