Online Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention to Reduce Suicide Ideation in Medical Interns

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 11 A.M. (ET), WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2015

 

To place an electronic embedded link to this study in your story Links will be live at the embargo time: http://archpsyc.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.1880; http://archpsyc.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.2112

Author Interview: An author audio interview will be available when the embargo lifts on the JAMA Psychiatry website: http://jama.md/1CAHnJb

 

JAMA Psychiatry

Physicians in training are at high risk for suicidal ideation (thoughts) during their internship year. In an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry, Constance Guille, M.D., of the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, and coauthors examined the effectiveness of a web-based cognitive behavioral therapy program delivered before the start of the medical internship year to prevent suicidal ideation in medical interns. Results of the randomized clinical trial at two university hospitals with 199 medical interns suggest the interns were amenable to the intervention and the intervention was associated with a reduced likelihood of suicidal ideation during the internship year.

To read the whole study and a related editorial, plus hear an author audio interview, please visit the For The Media website.

(JAMA Psychiatry. Published online November 4, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.1880. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor’s Note: The authors made project funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial

disclosures, funding and support, etc.

 

#  #  #

 

For more information, contact JAMA Network Media Relations at 312-464-JAMA (5262) or email mediarelations@jamanetwork.org.