Is Cigarette Type Associated With Lung Cancer Outcomes?

JAMA Internal Medicine

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 11 A.M. (ET), MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2019

Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article: This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3487?guestAccessKey=40e559a5-e128-4289-b617-a70f476d7dee&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=102119

 

What The Study Did: An association between lung cancer outcomes and the filter status of cigarettes, their tar level and menthol flavor was examined using data from more than 14,000 participants in a lung screening trial who completed detailed questionnaires about smoking.

Authors: Nichole T. Tanner, M.D., M.S.C.R., of the Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Hospital in Charleston, South Carolina, is the corresponding author.

 

(doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3487)

Editor’s Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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