Did Cholesterol Levels Improve Among U.S. Kids, Adolescents?

JAMA

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 11 A.M. (ET), TUESDAY, MAY 21, 2019

Media advisory: To contact corresponding author Amanda M. Perak, M.D., M.S., email Julie Pesch at jpesch@luriechildrens.org. The full study is linked to this news release.

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Bottom Line: This study examined cholesterol levels in children and adolescents in the U.S. from 1999 to 2016. Using nationally representative survey data for 26,000 young people (ages 6 to 19), the authors report favorable changes in cholesterol. Average levels of total cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein B decreased and average levels of the so-called good high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased. Still, estimates suggest only about half of the participants had ideal levels for all measures and as many as 25% had at least one suboptimal level.

Authors: Amanda M. Perak, M.D., M.S., Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, and coauthors

 

(doi:10.1001/jama.2019.4984)

Editor’s Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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