Certain Behaviors in Kindergarten Associated With Lower Adult Salary

JAMA Psychiatry

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 11 A.M. (ET), WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2019

Media advisory: To contact corresponding author Sylvana M. Cote, Ph.D., email Julie Gazaille at j.cordeau-gazaille@umontreal.ca. The full study is linked to this news release.

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Bottom Line: Inattention among kindergarteners was associated with lower earnings as adults in this study based on behavioral ratings from kindergarten teachers for 2,850 children in Canada at ages 5 or 6 and government tax returns for those same children as adults at ages 33 to 35. Researchers report that after accounting for IQ and family background, kindergarten inattention was associated with lower earning for boys and girls later in life, while kindergarten ratings of aggression and opposition (disobeying, refusing to share, blaming others) were associated with lower earnings only for boys. The results suggest early monitoring and support for children demonstrating certain behaviors could have long-term benefits. A limitation of the study is that it shows only associations and causal inferences can’t be made.

Authors: Sylvana M. Cote, Ph.D., Universite de Montreal, and coauthors

 

(doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2019.1326)

Editor’s Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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