Can Combining Low Doses of 3 High Blood Pressure Medications into One Pill Improve Blood Pressure Control?

JAMA

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 11 A.M. (ET), TUESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2018

Media advisory: To contact corresponding author Ruth Webster, Ph.D., email rwebster@georgeinstitute.org.au. The full study is available on the For The Media website.

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Bottom Line: Poorly controlled high blood pressure is a leading global public health problem requiring new treatment strategies. In most instances, inadequate blood pressure treatment can be mainly attributed to use of one medication, which has modest effectiveness. In a randomized clinical trial that included 700 patients in Sri Lanka with mild to moderate high blood pressure who were not receiving treatment or who were taking one medication, the daily use of a pill that contained low doses of three antihypertensive drugs for six months resulted in a greater percentage of patients achieving their target blood pressure goal.

Authors: Ruth Webster, Ph.D., The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, and coauthors

Visual Abstract: This is the link to the abstract when the embargo lifts.

Related material:

— The editorial, “Low-Dose Combination Blood Pressure Pharmacotherapy to Improve Treatment Effectiveness, Safety, and Efficiency” by Mark D. Huffman, M.D., M.P.H., Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, and coauthors is also available on the For The Media website.

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To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jama.2018.10359)

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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