Association of Race, Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status With Visual Impairment in Adolescent Children

JAMA Ophthalmology

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 11 A.M. (ET), THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2022

Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2022.3627?guestAccessKey=e8fe7302-2701-4c5b-bc79-e79fc927e51c&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=091522

 

About The Study: Adolescent children (ages 12 to 18 years) who identify as Black, Mexican American, low-income, or as a non-U.S. citizen were more likely to report poor subjective visual function and perform worse on objective visual acuity testing, suggesting that racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in visual function are evident by adolescence in the United States.

Authors: Isdin Oke, M.D., of Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston, is the corresponding author.

 

(doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2022.3627)

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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