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Trial Compares Ways to Elicit Patient Values About Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 3 P.M. (CT), MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013

 

JAMA Internal Medicine Study Highlights

Trial Compares Ways to Elicit Patient Values About Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening

Michael Patrick Pignone, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and colleagues conducted a randomized clinical in October 2011 in which men underwent a values clarification task and then chose the most important attribute for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening.

 

Men must consider how they value different potential outcomes to make good decisions about PSA screening, according to the study. The trial included 911 men (ages 50 to 70 years) from the United States and Australia who had average risk for prostate cancer.

 

“The participants who received the rating and ranking task were more likely to report reducing the chance of death from prostate cancer as being most important (54.4 percent) … Further studies with more distal outcome measures are needed to determine the best method of values clarification, if any, for decisions such as whether to undergo screening with PSA.”

(JAMA Intern Med. Published online February 11, 2013. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.2651. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

 

Editor’s Note: This study was funded by the University of North Carolina Cancer Research Fund and by an award from the National Cancer Institute. Please see article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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