The For The Media website offers news releases for upcoming studies from The JAMA Network journals, PDFs of embargoed studies, and the weekly JAMA Report video.
LEARN MORE: About The JAMA Network Journals | For the Media FAQs

New from the JAMA Report

use this as template for single videos
Read the Video Script
Print

DEPRESSION IN TEENAGERS CAN BE TREATED SUCCESSFULLY IN THE PRIMARY CARE SETTING

INTRO:Depression can have a significant impact on teenagers, increasing their risk of suicide and drug use. Many teens experiencing depression have problems engaging in treatment. A new study looked at whether offering screening, treatment and support in a primary care setting would be successful in improving depressive symptoms in teens. Catherine Dolf explains in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Teen outside sitting by water, teen sitting on bench, another teen sitting on bench

AUDIO
VO
CHANCES ARE SOME OF THESE TEENAGERS WHO ARE ENJOYING THE LAST DAYS OF SUMMER COULD ALSO BE DEALING WITH DEPRESSION. FOR MANY TEENS, ASKING FOR AND RECEIVING HELP FOR DEPRESSION IS DIFFICULT.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ :10 Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:08
“If we design systems to really reach out to teens and support teens we can deliver care and we can improve outcomes.”

(Video covering 2nd half of bite: Dr. Richardson walking down hallway)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Richardson walking into office, care manager walking down hallway, care manager talking to teenager, cu of teens hands holding phone, cu of teens face

AUDIO
VO
DR. LAURA RICHARDSON FROM SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AND CO-AUTHORS SCREENED TEENAGERS FOR DEPRESSION AT NINE HEALTH CARE PRACTICES. 50 TEENS IN THE INTERVENTION GROUP WERE ASSIGNED CARE MANAGERS WITHIN THEIR PRIMARY CARE PRACTICE. THESE MANAGERS FOLLOWED THE TEENS CLOSELY OFFERING EDUCATION, TREATMENT AND SUPPORT THROUGHOUT THE 12 MONTH STUDY.

AUDIO
NATSO/FULL Runs:04
“…how much have you been bothered by feeling down depressed irritable or hopeless…?”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Teen and care manager talking

AUDIO
vo
THE TEENS WERE ALSO ENCOURAGED TO CHOOSE THE KIND OF TREATMENT BEST FOR THEM.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL
Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:13
“Really talking to teens to understand what they need and addressing it from their perspective makes a big difference in having them engage in care and improve.”

(Video covering 2nd half of the bite: care manager going over diagram with teen)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Various shots of care manager and teen talking and looking at diagrams, care manager and teenager, cu of teen holding phone

AUDIO
VO
THE TEENS RECEIVED EITHER PSYCHOTHERAPY, ANTI-DEPRESSANT MEDICATION OR BOTH. THE OTHER 51 TEENS RECEIVED USUAL CARE, AND WERE ENCOURAGED TO SEEK MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PROVIDED THROUGH THEIR HEALTH PLANS.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:06 Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:11
“86 percent of the intervention youth received psychotherapy or medications or both compared to only 27 percent in the usual care group.”

(Video covering middle of bite: care manager filling out mood diary)

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
THE STUDY APPEARS IN JAMA, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ 1:20 Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:14
“The intervention youth by the end of the study had significant decreases in depressive symptoms compared to the usual care youth. They were significantly more likely to experience a 50 percent or more drop in symptoms.”

(Video covering middle of bite: pan down of depressive symptoms questionnaire)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Care manager sitting at computer going over diaries and questionnaires

AUDIO
VO
ALSO BY THE END OF THE STUDY, 50 PERCENT OF TEENS WORKING WITH A CARE MANAGER REPORTED HAVING NO DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS COMPARED TO 21 PERCENT IN THE USUAL CARE GROUP.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:44 Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:11
“It is feasible to offer treatment for depression in primary care and that when we do so, kids will engage in treatment and their depressive symptoms will get better.”
(Video covering 2nd half of bite: teen sitting alone on bench, teens walking dog)

B-ROLL
Teens walking dog

AUDIO
VO
CATHERINE DOLF, THE JAMA REPORT.

TAG: TEENAGERS WHO WORKED WITH THE CARE MANAGERS ALSO SAID THEY WERE HIGHLY SATISFIED WITH THE CARE AND TREATMENT THEY RECEIVED.

INTRO:Depression can have a significant impact on teenagers, increasing their risk of suicide and drug use. Many teens experiencing depression have problems engaging in treatment. A new study looked at whether offering screening, treatment and support in a primary care setting would be successful in improving depressive symptoms in teens. Catherine Dolf explains in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Teen outside sitting by water, teen sitting on bench, another teen sitting on bench

AUDIO
VO
CHANCES ARE SOME OF THESE TEENAGERS WHO ARE ENJOYING THE LAST DAYS OF SUMMER COULD ALSO BE DEALING WITH DEPRESSION. FOR MANY TEENS, ASKING FOR AND RECEIVING HELP FOR DEPRESSION IS DIFFICULT.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ :10 Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:08
“If we design systems to really reach out to teens and support teens we can deliver care and we can improve outcomes.”

(Video covering 2nd half of bite: Dr. Richardson walking down hallway)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Richardson walking into office, care manager walking down hallway, care manager talking to teenager, cu of teens hands holding phone, cu of teens face

AUDIO
VO
DR. LAURA RICHARDSON FROM SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AND CO-AUTHORS SCREENED TEENAGERS FOR DEPRESSION AT NINE HEALTH CARE PRACTICES. 50 TEENS IN THE INTERVENTION GROUP WERE ASSIGNED CARE MANAGERS WITHIN THEIR PRIMARY CARE PRACTICE. THESE MANAGERS FOLLOWED THE TEENS CLOSELY OFFERING EDUCATION, TREATMENT AND SUPPORT THROUGHOUT THE 12 MONTH STUDY.

AUDIO
NATSO/FULL Runs:04
“…how much have you been bothered by feeling down depressed irritable or hopeless…?”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Teen and care manager talking

AUDIO
vo
THE TEENS WERE ALSO ENCOURAGED TO CHOOSE THE KIND OF TREATMENT BEST FOR THEM.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL
Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:13
“Really talking to teens to understand what they need and addressing it from their perspective makes a big difference in having them engage in care and improve.”

(Video covering 2nd half of the bite: care manager going over diagram with teen)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Various shots of care manager and teen talking and looking at diagrams, care manager and teenager, cu of teen holding phone

AUDIO
VO
THE TEENS RECEIVED EITHER PSYCHOTHERAPY, ANTI-DEPRESSANT MEDICATION OR BOTH. THE OTHER 51 TEENS RECEIVED USUAL CARE, AND WERE ENCOURAGED TO SEEK MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PROVIDED THROUGH THEIR HEALTH PLANS.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:06 Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:11
“86 percent of the intervention youth received psychotherapy or medications or both compared to only 27 percent in the usual care group.”

(Video covering middle of bite: care manager filling out mood diary)

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
THE STUDY APPEARS IN JAMA, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ 1:20 Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:14
“The intervention youth by the end of the study had significant decreases in depressive symptoms compared to the usual care youth. They were significantly more likely to experience a 50 percent or more drop in symptoms.”

(Video covering middle of bite: pan down of depressive symptoms questionnaire)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Care manager sitting at computer going over diaries and questionnaires

AUDIO
VO
ALSO BY THE END OF THE STUDY, 50 PERCENT OF TEENS WORKING WITH A CARE MANAGER REPORTED HAVING NO DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS COMPARED TO 21 PERCENT IN THE USUAL CARE GROUP.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:44 Laura P. Richardson, M.D., M.P.H., – Seattle Children’s Hospital Runs:11
“It is feasible to offer treatment for depression in primary care and that when we do so, kids will engage in treatment and their depressive symptoms will get better.”
(Video covering 2nd half of bite: teen sitting alone on bench, teens walking dog)

B-ROLL
Teens walking dog

AUDIO
VO
CATHERINE DOLF, THE JAMA REPORT.

TAG: TEENAGERS WHO WORKED WITH THE CARE MANAGERS ALSO SAID THEY WERE HIGHLY SATISFIED WITH THE CARE AND TREATMENT THEY RECEIVED.

Recent News Releases

News releases are made freely available to the general public. View all Past Releases >

JAMA Internal Medicine

Releases For September 01, 2014

JAMA Internal Medicine

Releases For September 01, 2014