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PREGNANT WOMEN RECEIVING DETAILED INFORMATION ON PRENATAL TESTING LESS LIKELY TO UNDERGO THOSE TESTS

INTRO: Today, there are several different prenatal tests that can help determine whether or not a child will be born with a genetic problem like Down syndrome. Many of these tests are expensive and some are invasive. A new study evaluated whether providing detailed information about these tests and also providing the tests at no cost to women, would affect the decision to undergo testing. Catherine Dolf has more in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Ultrasound of fetus

AUDIO
VO
FOR MOST PREGNANT WOMEN, IT IS EXCITING TO LEARN THEY ARE EXPECTING.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:04 Rachel Freyre – Expectant Mom Runs:03
“Super excited…me and the dad are ecstatic.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Pregnant woman sitting at desk

AUDIO
VO
WHAT COMES NEXT IS A LOT OF NEW INFORMATION, INCLUDING WHETHER OR NOT TO UNDERGO PRENATAL TESTING.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:11 Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:09
“There are many prenatal tests out there that can help women understand whether they might be giving birth to a child with a genetic problem.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:20 Mary E. Norton, M.D., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:06
“The important thing is to really understand what the test is and why you are having it.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Norton and Dr. Kuppermann walking down hall, Rachel looking at screen and talking with Dr. Kuppermann, cu of decision guide playing

AUDIO
VO
DOCTORS MIRIAM KUPPERMANN AND MARY NORTON FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO AND CO-AUTHORS DEVELOPED A COMPUTERIZED DECISION SUPPORT GUIDE CONTAINING DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT PRENATAL TESTING.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ :40 Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:07
“It contains information about Down syndrome and the other conditions for which testing is available.”

(Video covering 1st part of bite: decision support guide page)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Various shots of Rachel and Dr. Kuppermann looking at decision guide

AUDIO
VO
MORE THAN 700 HUNDRED PREGNANT WOMEN WERE RECRUITED FROM VARYING ETHNIC AND SOCIOECONOMIC BACKGROUNDS. HALF VIEWED THE COMPUTERIZED VIDEO …

AUDIO
NATSO/FULL Runs: 03
“…problems with chromosomes are one cause of birth defects…”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Various shots of decision support guide

AUDIO
VO
…AND WERE THEN OFFERED PRENATAL TESTING FREE-OF-CHARGE. THE OTHER HALF DID NOT SEE THE DECISION SUPPORT GUIDE AND WERE NOT OFFERED FREE TESTS.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:01 Mary E. Norton, M.D., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:08
“The tests give more and more information and for some women more information is not necessarily what they want.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ 1:12 Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:15
“Women who had the opportunity to view the program were less likely to undergo diagnostic testing than women who did not have a study intervention. They better understood prenatal testing and its outcomes.”

(Video covering 2nd half of the bite: decision support guide)

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
THE STUDY APPEARS IN JAMA, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL
Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., – University of California, San Francisco
Super@ 1:28
Runs:10 “They also were more likely to correctly estimate the chances that their baby would have Down syndrome or that an amniocentesis could cause a miscarriage.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ 1:38 Rachel Freyre – Expectant Mom Runs:09
“It did help me figure out exactly what testing option I wanted to go with and I felt better about it just because I knew exactly what I’m being tested for.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ 1:47 Mary E. Norton, M.D., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:09
“It’s really important that women understand that it’s their choice to make and what the implications are of making a choice one way or the other.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Norton and Dr. Kuppermann looking at ultrasound

AUDIO
VO
CATHERINE DOLF, THE JAMA REPORT.

TAG: ALL THE WOMEN PARTICIPATING IN THE STUDY HAD NOT YET UNDERGONE ANY PRENATAL TESTING FOR CHROMOSOMAL PROBLEMS.

INTRO: Today, there are several different prenatal tests that can help determine whether or not a child will be born with a genetic problem like Down syndrome. Many of these tests are expensive and some are invasive. A new study evaluated whether providing detailed information about these tests and also providing the tests at no cost to women, would affect the decision to undergo testing. Catherine Dolf has more in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Ultrasound of fetus

AUDIO
VO
FOR MOST PREGNANT WOMEN, IT IS EXCITING TO LEARN THEY ARE EXPECTING.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:04 Rachel Freyre – Expectant Mom Runs:03
“Super excited…me and the dad are ecstatic.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Pregnant woman sitting at desk

AUDIO
VO
WHAT COMES NEXT IS A LOT OF NEW INFORMATION, INCLUDING WHETHER OR NOT TO UNDERGO PRENATAL TESTING.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:11 Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:09
“There are many prenatal tests out there that can help women understand whether they might be giving birth to a child with a genetic problem.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:20 Mary E. Norton, M.D., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:06
“The important thing is to really understand what the test is and why you are having it.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Norton and Dr. Kuppermann walking down hall, Rachel looking at screen and talking with Dr. Kuppermann, cu of decision guide playing

AUDIO
VO
DOCTORS MIRIAM KUPPERMANN AND MARY NORTON FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO AND CO-AUTHORS DEVELOPED A COMPUTERIZED DECISION SUPPORT GUIDE CONTAINING DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT PRENATAL TESTING.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ :40 Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:07
“It contains information about Down syndrome and the other conditions for which testing is available.”

(Video covering 1st part of bite: decision support guide page)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Various shots of Rachel and Dr. Kuppermann looking at decision guide

AUDIO
VO
MORE THAN 700 HUNDRED PREGNANT WOMEN WERE RECRUITED FROM VARYING ETHNIC AND SOCIOECONOMIC BACKGROUNDS. HALF VIEWED THE COMPUTERIZED VIDEO …

AUDIO
NATSO/FULL Runs: 03
“…problems with chromosomes are one cause of birth defects…”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Various shots of decision support guide

AUDIO
VO
…AND WERE THEN OFFERED PRENATAL TESTING FREE-OF-CHARGE. THE OTHER HALF DID NOT SEE THE DECISION SUPPORT GUIDE AND WERE NOT OFFERED FREE TESTS.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:01 Mary E. Norton, M.D., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:08
“The tests give more and more information and for some women more information is not necessarily what they want.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ 1:12 Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:15
“Women who had the opportunity to view the program were less likely to undergo diagnostic testing than women who did not have a study intervention. They better understood prenatal testing and its outcomes.”

(Video covering 2nd half of the bite: decision support guide)

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
THE STUDY APPEARS IN JAMA, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL
Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., – University of California, San Francisco
Super@ 1:28
Runs:10 “They also were more likely to correctly estimate the chances that their baby would have Down syndrome or that an amniocentesis could cause a miscarriage.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ 1:38 Rachel Freyre – Expectant Mom Runs:09
“It did help me figure out exactly what testing option I wanted to go with and I felt better about it just because I knew exactly what I’m being tested for.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ 1:47 Mary E. Norton, M.D., – University of California, San Francisco Runs:09
“It’s really important that women understand that it’s their choice to make and what the implications are of making a choice one way or the other.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Norton and Dr. Kuppermann looking at ultrasound

AUDIO
VO
CATHERINE DOLF, THE JAMA REPORT.

TAG: ALL THE WOMEN PARTICIPATING IN THE STUDY HAD NOT YET UNDERGONE ANY PRENATAL TESTING FOR CHROMOSOMAL PROBLEMS.

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