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Rent Supplements and Mental Health Support Improve Housing Stability for Homeless Adults

INTRO:Many homeless adults struggle with mental illness as well as substance use disorders. Most programs designed to help homeless individuals require them to first enter treatment, rehabilitation and then transitional housing. A new study evaluated a program where homeless adults transition directly from the streets or shelters to permanent housing, while also receiving intensive mental health support.  Catherine Dolf has the details in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Hercules taking cup out of cabinet

AUDIO
VO
HERCULES IS ENJOYING HIS NEW HOME.

AUDIO
SOT/FULLSuper@:03 Hercules – Study Participant Runs:07
“After 10 years of homeless, I felt like I was born again.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Hercules in kitchen, pouring water into coffee cups, bringing coffee into dinging room and sits down talking with his support advocate

AUDIO
VO
After losing his business and then his mother, he became depressed. Hercules participated in the “Housing First” Program where homeless adults move directly from the street or shelters into permanent housing while working closely with a support team.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:23 Vicky Stergiopoulos, M.D., – St. Michael’s Hospital Runs:10
“Individuals with moderate mental health needs represents a very large segment of the homeless populations across North America.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Stergiopoulos and Dr. Hwang down hallway, neighborhoods from the car, Hercules at table talking, advocate and Hercules talking, apartment building, advocate and another study participant talking

AUDIO
VO
Doctors Vicky Stergiopoulos (Stir-Jah-Puh-Lus) and Stephen Hwang (Wang) from St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto and co-authors, recruited about 12 hundred homeless individuals from four large cities across Canada. A little more than half the participants received rent supplements and intensive mental health support from project teams. The remaining participants did not receive rent supplements and were instead directed to services available in their community.  Both groups were followed for up to two years.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:57 Vicky Stergiopoulos, M.D., – St. Michael’s Hospital Runs:10
“Individuals in the intervention group had much greater success in achieving stable housing compared to the usual care group.”

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
The study appears in JAMA, Journal of the American Medical Association.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:10 Stephen W. Hwang, M.D., – St. Michael’s Hospital Runs:10
“While the intervention is very successful, their overall quality of life did not improve significantly as a result of the intervention.”

(Video covering middle of bite: patient and advocate talking)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Driving shot of apartment building and houses

AUDIO
VO
The “Housing First” model has been used for homeless individuals experiencing severe mental illness, who required intensive and costly support services.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:31 Stephen W. Hwang, M.D., – St. Michael’s Hospital Runs:12
“We can now broaden this model to include people who have more moderate needs for services and can do so at a lower cost than the more intensive version of the intervention.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Hercules sitting at table talking, in bedroom with his cat making his bed

AUDIO
VO
Hercules has taken computer courses, meets regularly with his support advocate and even rescued his cat Leo. He also helps those who are still homeless, encouraging them to stay positive.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:49 Hercules – Study Participant Runs:08
“Just keep you chin up and see the green light that’s going to come at some point.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Hercules on his balcony

AUDIO
Catherine Dolf, the JAMA Report.

TAG: The study was conducted in response to the growing number of homeless individuals all across Canada.

INTRO:Many homeless adults struggle with mental illness as well as substance use disorders. Most programs designed to help homeless individuals require them to first enter treatment, rehabilitation and then transitional housing. A new study evaluated a program where homeless adults transition directly from the streets or shelters to permanent housing, while also receiving intensive mental health support.  Catherine Dolf has the details in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Hercules taking cup out of cabinet

AUDIO
VO
HERCULES IS ENJOYING HIS NEW HOME.

AUDIO
SOT/FULLSuper@:03 Hercules – Study Participant Runs:07
“After 10 years of homeless, I felt like I was born again.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Hercules in kitchen, pouring water into coffee cups, bringing coffee into dinging room and sits down talking with his support advocate

AUDIO
VO
After losing his business and then his mother, he became depressed. Hercules participated in the “Housing First” Program where homeless adults move directly from the street or shelters into permanent housing while working closely with a support team.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:23 Vicky Stergiopoulos, M.D., – St. Michael’s Hospital Runs:10
“Individuals with moderate mental health needs represents a very large segment of the homeless populations across North America.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Stergiopoulos and Dr. Hwang down hallway, neighborhoods from the car, Hercules at table talking, advocate and Hercules talking, apartment building, advocate and another study participant talking

AUDIO
VO
Doctors Vicky Stergiopoulos (Stir-Jah-Puh-Lus) and Stephen Hwang (Wang) from St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto and co-authors, recruited about 12 hundred homeless individuals from four large cities across Canada. A little more than half the participants received rent supplements and intensive mental health support from project teams. The remaining participants did not receive rent supplements and were instead directed to services available in their community.  Both groups were followed for up to two years.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:57 Vicky Stergiopoulos, M.D., – St. Michael’s Hospital Runs:10
“Individuals in the intervention group had much greater success in achieving stable housing compared to the usual care group.”

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
The study appears in JAMA, Journal of the American Medical Association.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:10 Stephen W. Hwang, M.D., – St. Michael’s Hospital Runs:10
“While the intervention is very successful, their overall quality of life did not improve significantly as a result of the intervention.”

(Video covering middle of bite: patient and advocate talking)

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Driving shot of apartment building and houses

AUDIO
VO
The “Housing First” model has been used for homeless individuals experiencing severe mental illness, who required intensive and costly support services.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:31 Stephen W. Hwang, M.D., – St. Michael’s Hospital Runs:12
“We can now broaden this model to include people who have more moderate needs for services and can do so at a lower cost than the more intensive version of the intervention.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Hercules sitting at table talking, in bedroom with his cat making his bed

AUDIO
VO
Hercules has taken computer courses, meets regularly with his support advocate and even rescued his cat Leo. He also helps those who are still homeless, encouraging them to stay positive.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:49 Hercules – Study Participant Runs:08
“Just keep you chin up and see the green light that’s going to come at some point.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Hercules on his balcony

AUDIO
Catherine Dolf, the JAMA Report.

TAG: The study was conducted in response to the growing number of homeless individuals all across Canada.

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