The For The Media website offers news releases for upcoming studies from The JAMA Network journals, PDFs of embargoed studies, and the weekly JAMA Report video.
LEARN MORE: About The JAMA Network Journals | For the Media FAQs

New from the JAMA Report

use this as template for single videos
Read the Video Script
Print

MEDICATION AND COUNSELING HELP SMOKERS QUIT AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL

INTRO: Hospitals are smoke free zones. So when smokers are admitted to the hospital for any reason they must leave their cigarettes behind. This can be a good opportunity to try to quit. A new study examined whether offering hospitalized smokers medication and counseling would help them stay smoke free after leaving. Catherine Dolf explains in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
John walking down the street

AUDIO
VO
JOHN LINDI BEGAN SMOKING AT AGE 13.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ :03 John Lindi – Study Participant Runs:08
“I had tried quitting several times. I’d make it as long as a week or two weeks and then finally just cave in.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Outside the hospital, John walking into building, nicotine patch, John walking

AUDIO
VO
DURING A RECENT HOSPITAL STAY, JOHN KNEW HE WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO SMOKE. HE WAS OFFERED MEDICATION LIKE THESE NICOTINE PATCHES. HE WAS ALSO OFFERED COUNSELING TO HELP HIM TRY AND MAKE A PERMANENT BREAK WITH CIGARETTES.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ :22 John Lindi – Study Participant Runs:04
“The girl that came in and talked to me was really, really cool, you know supportive.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:26 Nancy A. Rigotti, M.D., – Massachusetts General Hospital Runs:07
“We know that medication works and that counseling works but they both together work much better than either one alone.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Rigotti sitting at desk looking at computer, side shot of Dr. Rigotti, woman sitting outside smoking, counselor talking with a patient, various medications, counselor writing on chart

AUDIO
vo
DR. NANCY RIGOTTI FROM MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL AND CO-AUTHORS DESIGNED A SIMPLE SYSTEM TO HELP SMOKERS STAY SMOKE FREE AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL. 397 PATIENTS WERE DIVIDED INTO TWO GROUPS. ONE GROUP JUST RECEIVED RECOMMENDATIONS ABOUT HOW TO QUIT. THE OTHER GROUP WAS PROVIDED WITH VARIOUS MEDICATIONS, COUNSELING WHILE IN THE HOSPITAL…

AUDIO
NATSO/FULL Runs:04
“…how has it been for you since you’ve been admitted and not smoking…”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Graphic with phone in middle of screen

AUDIO
VO
… AUTOMATED PHONE CALLS CHECKING THEIR PROGRESS…

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Graphic, Audio of phone call

AUDIO
NATSO/FULL Runs:11
“…ring…we hope you are feeling better since you left the hospital…have you smoked a cigarette, even a puff in the last 7 days?…”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Counselor and patient talking

AUDIO
VO
…AND ACCESS TO ADDITIONAL COUNSELING FOR THREE MONTHS AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:13 Nancy A. Rigotti, M.D., – Massachusetts General Hospital Runs:09
“We were able to increase the quit rates six months after discharge by over 70 percent by providing this simple system of care.”

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
THE STUDY APPEARS IN JAMA, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:26 Nancy A. Rigotti, M.D., – Massachusetts General Hospital Runs:12
“We looked to see whether the treatment worked as well in different kinds of smokers, black, white, men, women, rich, poor and so forth. And we found that it worked well in all kinds of smokers.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
John drinking water

AUDIO
VO
JOHN HAS BEEN SMOKE FREE FOR MORE THAN A YEAR NOW.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:41 John Lindi – Study Participant Runs:07
“The benefit in the long run to just saying no to it is far greater than the benefit of having a cigarette.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:47 Nancy A. Rigotti, M.D., – Massachusetts General Hospital Runs:07
“It’s important that hospitals do their part to help smokers stay healthy by staying smoke free after they leave the hospital.”

AUDIO
VO
CATHERINE DOLF, THE JAMA REPORT.

TAG:OFFERING SMOKERS HELP TO QUIT WHILE IN THE HOSPITAL IS ONE OF THE QUALITY MEASURES ENDORSED BY THE JOINT COMMISSION AND THE NATIONAL QUALITY FORUM.

INTRO: Hospitals are smoke free zones. So when smokers are admitted to the hospital for any reason they must leave their cigarettes behind. This can be a good opportunity to try to quit. A new study examined whether offering hospitalized smokers medication and counseling would help them stay smoke free after leaving. Catherine Dolf explains in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
John walking down the street

AUDIO
VO
JOHN LINDI BEGAN SMOKING AT AGE 13.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ :03 John Lindi – Study Participant Runs:08
“I had tried quitting several times. I’d make it as long as a week or two weeks and then finally just cave in.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Outside the hospital, John walking into building, nicotine patch, John walking

AUDIO
VO
DURING A RECENT HOSPITAL STAY, JOHN KNEW HE WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO SMOKE. HE WAS OFFERED MEDICATION LIKE THESE NICOTINE PATCHES. HE WAS ALSO OFFERED COUNSELING TO HELP HIM TRY AND MAKE A PERMANENT BREAK WITH CIGARETTES.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@ :22 John Lindi – Study Participant Runs:04
“The girl that came in and talked to me was really, really cool, you know supportive.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:26 Nancy A. Rigotti, M.D., – Massachusetts General Hospital Runs:07
“We know that medication works and that counseling works but they both together work much better than either one alone.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Rigotti sitting at desk looking at computer, side shot of Dr. Rigotti, woman sitting outside smoking, counselor talking with a patient, various medications, counselor writing on chart

AUDIO
vo
DR. NANCY RIGOTTI FROM MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL AND CO-AUTHORS DESIGNED A SIMPLE SYSTEM TO HELP SMOKERS STAY SMOKE FREE AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL. 397 PATIENTS WERE DIVIDED INTO TWO GROUPS. ONE GROUP JUST RECEIVED RECOMMENDATIONS ABOUT HOW TO QUIT. THE OTHER GROUP WAS PROVIDED WITH VARIOUS MEDICATIONS, COUNSELING WHILE IN THE HOSPITAL…

AUDIO
NATSO/FULL Runs:04
“…how has it been for you since you’ve been admitted and not smoking…”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Graphic with phone in middle of screen

AUDIO
VO
… AUTOMATED PHONE CALLS CHECKING THEIR PROGRESS…

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Graphic, Audio of phone call

AUDIO
NATSO/FULL Runs:11
“…ring…we hope you are feeling better since you left the hospital…have you smoked a cigarette, even a puff in the last 7 days?…”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Counselor and patient talking

AUDIO
VO
…AND ACCESS TO ADDITIONAL COUNSELING FOR THREE MONTHS AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:13 Nancy A. Rigotti, M.D., – Massachusetts General Hospital Runs:09
“We were able to increase the quit rates six months after discharge by over 70 percent by providing this simple system of care.”

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
THE STUDY APPEARS IN JAMA, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:26 Nancy A. Rigotti, M.D., – Massachusetts General Hospital Runs:12
“We looked to see whether the treatment worked as well in different kinds of smokers, black, white, men, women, rich, poor and so forth. And we found that it worked well in all kinds of smokers.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
John drinking water

AUDIO
VO
JOHN HAS BEEN SMOKE FREE FOR MORE THAN A YEAR NOW.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:41 John Lindi – Study Participant Runs:07
“The benefit in the long run to just saying no to it is far greater than the benefit of having a cigarette.”

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:47 Nancy A. Rigotti, M.D., – Massachusetts General Hospital Runs:07
“It’s important that hospitals do their part to help smokers stay healthy by staying smoke free after they leave the hospital.”

AUDIO
VO
CATHERINE DOLF, THE JAMA REPORT.

TAG:OFFERING SMOKERS HELP TO QUIT WHILE IN THE HOSPITAL IS ONE OF THE QUALITY MEASURES ENDORSED BY THE JOINT COMMISSION AND THE NATIONAL QUALITY FORUM.

Recent News Releases

News releases are made freely available to the general public. View all Past Releases >

JAMA

Releases For August 19, 2014

JAMA Internal Medicine

Releases For August 18, 2014