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Researchers Examine Effect of Experimental Ebola Vaccine After High-Risk Exposure

INTRO:Ebola has claimed thousands of lives in West Africa. Investigational drugs and vaccines are being evaluated in hopes of treating and preventing Ebola infection. Effective vaccines are also needed to protect health care workers who may be exposed to Ebola virus during patient care. One of these investigational vaccines had real-life implications last September. Catherine Dolf explains in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Zoom into vial and syringe, various shots of technicians in lab, health care worker entering room gowned and protected

AUDIO
VO
In the future, the key to preventing ebola infection could be found in a vial like this. An investigational vaccine was given to a U-S doctor after he experienced an accidental needlestick, while caring for critically ill patients at an ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:14 Mark Mulligan, M.D., – Emory University Runs:08
“At the time we used it in late September, it had been given to only one human previously.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Mulligan walking into lab, graphic: plane on map

AUDIO
VO
Dr. Mark Mulligan from Emory University and co-authors assessed the doctor’s response to the V-S-V Ebola vaccine. Because of the concern for potentially lethal Ebola infection, the doctor was offered the investigational vaccine, which was put on a jet in Atlanta and flown to Sierra Leone. 43 hours after the accidental exposure, the doctor received the vaccine as he boarded the jet for evacuation to the U.S. He was flown back and monitored at the National Institutes of Health.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:48 Mark Mulligan, M.D., – Emory University Runs:15
“We saw strong responses from the innate immune system, the immediate responses, the first defenders in our body and also from the subsequent antibodies and T cells that we want a vaccine to produce.”

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
The full report appears in JAMA, Journal of the American Medical Association.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:07 Mark Mulligan, M.D., – Emory University Runs:10
“The vaccine produced a strong immune response of the type that we think could be useful in either a prevention or a post-exposure setting.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Graphic: List of side effects

AUDIO
VO
The doctor experienced significant side effects from the vaccine including fever, chills, headache, nausea and muscle aches.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:24 Mark Mulligan, M.D., – Emory University Runs:05
“As the vaccine virus cleared from his bloodstream the vaccine related symptoms went away.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Various shots of Dr. Mulligan looking into microscope, various shots of technicians working in lab

AUDIO
VO
Fortunately, the doctor did not develop Ebola virus infection and the response of his immune system to the V-S-V vaccine was very informative for researchers.  Larger studies are underway to understand the safety and effectiveness of this and other potential Ebola vaccines.   Catherine Dolf, the JAMA Report.

Tag: The patient was hospitalized for about a week and continued his 21-day observation period at home.

INTRO:Ebola has claimed thousands of lives in West Africa. Investigational drugs and vaccines are being evaluated in hopes of treating and preventing Ebola infection. Effective vaccines are also needed to protect health care workers who may be exposed to Ebola virus during patient care. One of these investigational vaccines had real-life implications last September. Catherine Dolf explains in this week’s JAMA Report.

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Zoom into vial and syringe, various shots of technicians in lab, health care worker entering room gowned and protected

AUDIO
VO
In the future, the key to preventing ebola infection could be found in a vial like this. An investigational vaccine was given to a U-S doctor after he experienced an accidental needlestick, while caring for critically ill patients at an ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:14 Mark Mulligan, M.D., – Emory University Runs:08
“At the time we used it in late September, it had been given to only one human previously.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Dr. Mulligan walking into lab, graphic: plane on map

AUDIO
VO
Dr. Mark Mulligan from Emory University and co-authors assessed the doctor’s response to the V-S-V Ebola vaccine. Because of the concern for potentially lethal Ebola infection, the doctor was offered the investigational vaccine, which was put on a jet in Atlanta and flown to Sierra Leone. 43 hours after the accidental exposure, the doctor received the vaccine as he boarded the jet for evacuation to the U.S. He was flown back and monitored at the National Institutes of Health.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@:48 Mark Mulligan, M.D., – Emory University Runs:15
“We saw strong responses from the innate immune system, the immediate responses, the first defenders in our body and also from the subsequent antibodies and T cells that we want a vaccine to produce.”

GXF FULL
JAMA COVER

AUDIO
VO
The full report appears in JAMA, Journal of the American Medical Association.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:07 Mark Mulligan, M.D., – Emory University Runs:10
“The vaccine produced a strong immune response of the type that we think could be useful in either a prevention or a post-exposure setting.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Graphic: List of side effects

AUDIO
VO
The doctor experienced significant side effects from the vaccine including fever, chills, headache, nausea and muscle aches.

AUDIO
SOT/FULL Super@1:24 Mark Mulligan, M.D., – Emory University Runs:05
“As the vaccine virus cleared from his bloodstream the vaccine related symptoms went away.”

VIDEO
B-ROLL
Various shots of Dr. Mulligan looking into microscope, various shots of technicians working in lab

AUDIO
VO
Fortunately, the doctor did not develop Ebola virus infection and the response of his immune system to the V-S-V vaccine was very informative for researchers.  Larger studies are underway to understand the safety and effectiveness of this and other potential Ebola vaccines.   Catherine Dolf, the JAMA Report.

Tag: The patient was hospitalized for about a week and continued his 21-day observation period at home.

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